Skip to main content

148,328
UPLOADS


Media Type
141,995
images
6,327
movies
3
audio
2
data
1
texts
Year
3,368
2009
8,856
2008
10,993
2007
7,967
2006
7,733
2005
6,879
2004
More right-solid
Topics & Subjects
20,567
Where -- Kennedy Space Center (KSC)
18,691
What -- International Space Station (ISS)
17,010
What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter
12,541
What -- Earth
6,675
Where -- California
6,597
What -- Discovery
More right-solid
Collection
More right-solid
Creator
45,253
nasa
32,097
nasa/glenn research center
21,703
nasa/langley research center
4,887
nasa/ames research center
4,327
nasa/langley research center (nasa-larc)
4,030
nasa/marshall space flight center
More right-solid
Language
797
English
SHOW DETAILS
up-solid down-solid
Prior Page
eye
Title
Date Archived
Creator
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 144
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration explains how gravitational lensing, a prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity, can be used to determine the location of mass in a galaxy cluster. Gravity from mass in the galaxy cluster distorts light from background galaxies. In the idealized case shown here, two distorted images of one background galaxy are seen above and below the real location of the galaxy. By looking at the shapes of many different background galaxies, it is possible to make a map showing...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/1e0657/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 136
favorite 0
comment 0
This three-color high energy X-ray image (red =1.3-3 keV, green = 3-6 keV, blue = 6-8 keV) of NGC 1068 shows gas rushing away from the nucleus. The brightest point-like source may be the inner wall of the torus that is reflecting X-rays from the hidden nucleus. (Credit: NASA/CXC/MIT/UCSB/P.Ogle et al.)
Topic: Where -- NGC 1
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/ngc1068/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 113
favorite 0
comment 0
This figure shows the typical growth, over cosmic time, of supermassive black holes with masses greater than 100 million Suns (these objects include the largest black holes in the Universe). These large black holes grow quickly in the early Universe but their growth then stops ("hits the wall"), perhaps because powerful winds or jets generated by the feeding frenzy of the black holes clears out any remaining fuel. The rapid, early growth of these large black holes, as observed with...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/bhlock/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 126
favorite 0
comment 0
More Images of M87 (Jet)
Topic: Where -- M87
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2001/0134/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. Minn./R.Gehrz
image
eye 180
favorite 2
comment 0
This view of the supernova remnant obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope on June 1, 2005 shows the infrared view of this complex object. The blue region traces the cloud of energetic electrons trapped within the star's magnetic field, emitting so-called "synchrotron" radiation. The yellow-red features follow the well-known filamentary structures that permeate this nebula. Though they are known to contain hot gasses, their exact nature is still a mystery that astronomers are...
Topic: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/crab/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Digitized Sky Survey
image
eye 167
favorite 0
comment 0
This visible light image is a wide-field look at the region surrounding the pair of colliding galaxies known as The Antennae. Scale:
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/antennae/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Pal.Obs. DSS
image
eye 157
favorite 0
comment 0
This image from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS)/Palomar 48-inch Schmidt telescope shows NGC 1128 in visible light. The peculiar dumbbell structure of this galaxy is thought to be due to two large galaxies that are in the process of merging. Such mergers are common in the relatively congested environment of galaxy clusters. An alternative hypothesis is that the apparent structure is the result of a coincidence in time when the two galaxies are passing one another, like ships in the cosmic sea.
Topics: What -- Visible Light, Where -- NGC 1
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/a400/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 143
favorite 0
comment 0
This series of illustrations shows how an outburst from Sgr A* -- produced when material falls into the black hole -- generates a light echo. The faint, star-like object in the center represents the typical, quiet behavior, when the black hole does not have much material to consume. When the black hole's feeding rate increases dramatically, the material around Sgr A* brightens. Although the black hole outburst stops, the light from the outburst continues to travel outwards and then reflects, or...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/gcle/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 139
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration shows how X-rays are thought to be produced in SDSSp J1306. Material from a large torus of gas and dust in the center of a galaxy is pulled toward a black hole. Most of the infalling gas is concentrated in a rapidly rotating disk, and a hot atmosphere or corona where temperatures can climb to billions of degrees. Collisions of low-energy optical, ultraviolet and X-ray photons from the disk with the hot electrons in the corona boost the energy of the photons up to the...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/j1306/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Top: NASA/UMass/D.Wang et al. Bottom Left: NASA/CXC/MIT/F.K.Baganoff et al. Bottom Right: NASA/CXC/UCLA/M.Muno et al.
image
eye 119
favorite 0
comment 0
This three-paneled image shows Chandra's latest results from the Galactic Center (bottom right) in context of previously released images. The top panel is a portion of Chandra's 900- by 400-light year mosaic of the Milky Way's center including its supermassive black hole, known as Sgr A*. The box marked "(A)" of the mosaic outlines a smaller region shown in the lower left panel, where about 2,000 individual X-ray sources are detected. The final panel "(B)" shows four sources...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/gctr_bin/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss
image
eye 189
favorite 1
comment 0
This side-view schematic of the Milky Way galaxy, shows the prominent spiral arms, the central galactic bulge, and the location of the Sun. Scale:
Topics: What -- Sun, Where -- Milky Way Galaxy
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/w3/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 107
favorite 0
comment 0
This smoothed black and white image shows an alternative version of comet Tempel 1 as seen by Chandra on June 30, 2005. The comet was bright and condensed. The Chandra data indicate that the X-rays observed from Tempel 1 are primarily due to the interaction between highly charged oxygen ions in the solar wind and neutral gases from the comet. (Credit: NASA/CXC/C.Lisse & S.Wolk)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/dimpact/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 122
favorite 0
comment 0
This three-color low energy X-ray image of NGC 1068 (red = 0.4-0.6 keV, green = 0.6-0.8 keV, blue = 0.8-1.3 keV) shows gas rushing away from the the nucleus (bright white spot). The range of colors from blue to red corresponds to a high through low ionization of the atoms in the wind. (Credit: NASA/CXC/MIT/UCSB/P.Ogle et al.)
Topic: Where -- NGC 1
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/ngc1068/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 113
favorite 1
comment 0
This radio image of 4C41.17 is a composite of 1.4 GHz and 4.9GHz data taken by the VLA on December 4, 1988 and May 4, 1992 respectively. In the image, 1.4 GHz is shown in red and 4.9GHz in purple. (Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF/Columbia/C.Scharf et al.)
Topic: What -- VLA
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/4c41/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NRAO/AUI/NSF/F.Zadeh et al.
image
eye 87
favorite 0
comment 0
This radio image of the star cluster DB01-42 was taken on May 04, 1985 with NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA). The field of view is the same as the Chandra data (above). Scale:
Topics: What -- Very Large Array, What -- VLA
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/db/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 ESO/Danish 1.54-m/W. Keel et al.
image
eye 80
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae was taken with the European Southern Observatory's Danish 1.54-m Telescope at La Silla, Chile. Scale:
Topic: Where -- Chile
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/47tuc/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NRAO/VLA/Brandeis/T. Cheung
image
eye 106
favorite 0
comment 0
This radio image of the quasar GB1508+5714 was taken on July 14, 1995 with NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.4 GHz. The data then when into the VLA archive and was reanalyzed by Teddy Cheung at Brandeis University. The detection of the similar feature in the radio data confirmed the existence of the jet associated with the quasar GB1508+5714 and provided clues about the process that created it. In this image, north is up, and east is to the left. Scale:
Topics: What -- Very Large Array, What -- VLA
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/gb1508/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 125
favorite 0
comment 0
This schematic illustrates how Jupiter's unusually frequent and spectacular auroral activity is produced. Jupiter's strong, rapidly rotating magnetic field (light blue lines) generates strong electric fields in the space around the planet. Particles (white dots) from Jupiter's volcanically active moon, Io, drift outward to create a huge reservoir of electrons and ions. These charged particles, trapped in Jupiter's magnetic field, are continually being accelerated (gold particles) down into the...
Topics: What -- Moon, What -- Io, What -- Polar, What -- Jupiter
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/jupiter/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 274
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of Adromeda was taken by the National Science Foundation's 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Located in the constellation of Andromeda (the Princess), the Andromeda Galaxy is a large spiral galaxy very similar to our own Galaxy, the Milky Way. Also known as Andromeda Galaxy (M31), the Andromeda Galaxy is over 65,000 light years in diameter and approximately 2.9 million light years from Earth. (Credit: NOAO/AURA/NSF/T.Rector & B.A.Wolpa)
Topics: What -- Constellation, What -- Andromeda, What -- Earth, Where -- M31
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/m31/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/STScI/Rice Univ./C.O'Dell et al.
image
eye 189
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of the central region of the Orion Nebula Nebula Cluster was obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and released in 1995. The image emphasizes the gas in the cluster, and shows nitrogen emission in red, hydrogen emission in green and oxygen emission in blue. The image contains over a hundred protoplanetary disks ("proplyds"), regions where planet formation should occur. The four members of the Orion Nebula Trapezium can be seen near the center of the image. This...
Topics: What -- Orion, What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/orion/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 115
favorite 0
comment 0
This schematic illustrates how Jupiter's unusually frequent and spectacular auroral activity is produced. Jupiter's strong, rapidly rotating magnetic field (light blue lines) generates strong electric fields in the space around the planet. Particles (white dots) from Jupiter's volcanically active moon, Io, drift outward to create a huge reservoir of electrons and ions. These charged particles, trapped in Jupiter's magnetic field, are continually being accelerated (gold particles) down into the...
Topics: What -- Moon, What -- Io, What -- Polar, What -- Jupiter
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/jupiter/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NRAO/AUI/NSF/O. Eilek & Kassim
image
eye 150
favorite 0
comment 0
This radio image of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 was taken on July 12, 1998 with NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA). The radio observations, along with Chandra data, are dramatic evidence that repetitive outbursts from the central supermassive black hole have been affecting the entire galaxy for a hundred million years or more. Scale:
Topics: What -- Very Large Array, What -- VLA, Where -- M87
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/m87/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 111
favorite 0
comment 0
This shows an X-ray spectrum obtained by Chandra observations. The dips seen in the spectrum are produced by absorption from a wide variety of atoms in the gas around the black hole, ranging from oxygen to nickel. A detailed study of these absorption features shows that the atoms are highly ionized and are moving away from the black hole in a high-speed wind. The conclusion of this study is that this wind is driven by magnetic fields. (Credit: NASA/CXC/U.Michigan/J.Miller et al.)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/j1655/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 ESO/MPE/S.Komossa
image
eye 100
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of RX J1242-11 was obtained with the 1.5m Danish telescope at ESO/La Silla, and had an exposure time of 7 minutes. A pair of galaxies are visible, with the white circle showing the position of the Chandra source in the center of the brighter galaxy, the expected location for a supermassive black hole. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/rxj1242/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/ASU/J. Hester et al.
image
eye 183
favorite 0
comment 1
This image represents a snapshot from a movie that shows dynamic rings, wisps and jets of matter and antimatter around the pulsar in the Crab Nebula as observed in X-ray light by Chandra. The inner ring is about one light year across. Scale:
favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite ( 1 reviews )
Topic: What -- Snapshot
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2002/0052/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NOAO/AURA/NSF/G.Jacoby, B.Bohannan & M.Hanna
image
eye 123
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of M101 (aka the Pinwheel Galaxy, or NGC 5457) was taken by NOAO's Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 0.9-meter telescope. M101, a spiral galaxy about 22 million light years away in the constellation Ursa Major, is similar to our own Galaxy, the Milky Way.
Topics: What -- Constellation, What -- Ursa Major, Where -- M101, Where -- Pinwheel Galaxy, Where -- NGC...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/sn70/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 113
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of hydrogen line-emission obtained by the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope shows the galaxy ESO 137-001 and its long tail. The white circles show 29 regions of ionized hydrogen that are being lit up by newly formed stars. These regions if star formation are all downstream of the galaxy, located in or near the tail. It is believed that the stars formed within the last 10 million years or so. (Credit: SOAR (MSU/NOAO/UNC/CNPq-Brazil)/M.Sun et al.)
Topic: What -- ESO
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/a3627/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 133
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of the active galaxy NGC 1068, taken by Hubble's WFPC2, gives a detailed view of the spiral arms in the inner parts of the galaxy. (Credit: NASA/STScI/A.Capetti et al.)
Topics: What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Where -- NGC 1
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/ngc1068/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 ESO/WFI/2.2-m MPG
image
eye 129
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of the super star cluster "Westerlund 1" is from the European Southern Observatory's 2.2-m MPG/ESO Wide-Field Imager. The foreground stars appear blue, while the hot massive members of the cluster look orange, and the cool massive ones come out red. Westerlund 1 is located in the Southern constellation Ara (the Altar). It was discovered in 1961 from Australia by Swedish astronomer Bengt Westerlund. This cluster is behind a huge interstellar cloud of gas and dust,...
Topics: What -- Imager, What -- Constellation, What -- Ara, What -- Visible Light, What -- ESO, Where --...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/wd1/more.html
This mosiac of Chandra images shows the intensity of X-rays in the central region of the Milky Way. (Credit: NASA/UMass/D.Wang et al.)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2002/gcenter/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 KPNO Optical: NSF/NOAO/KPNO/B.McNamara
image
eye 62
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image of MS0735.6+7421 was taken by the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and shows a smaller field of view than the Chandra data. The large elliptical galaxy at the center of the image contains the supermassive black hole that generated the cavities in the Chandra image. The optical/X-ray comparison shows that the cavities are much larger than the elliptical galaxy. Other, smaller galaxies in the cluster are also visible in this image. Some of the relatively bright objects...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/ms0735/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Pal.Obs. DSS
image
eye 178
favorite 0
comment 0
This image from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) shows the elliptical galaxy NGC 4261 in visible light. The field of view is the same as the Chandra image. Scale:
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/ngc4261/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 92
favorite 0
comment 0
This mosiac of Chandra images shows the intensity of X-rays in the central region of the Milky Way. (Credit: NASA/UMass/D.Wang et al.)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2002/gcenter/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NOAO/Kitt Peak/J.Uson, D.Dale, S.Boughn, J.Kuhn
image
eye 101
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image from the Kitt Peak 0.9m telescope shows Abell 2029, a cluster of galaxies. A large elliptical galaxy is visible in the center of the image, surrounded by smaller galaxies. This galaxy cluster has a redshift of 0.078, at a distance corresponding to a light travel time of one billion years. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/darkenergy/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 84
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical (Lyman-alpha) image of 4C41.17 was observed on December 27, 2000 for 27.6 ks by the Keck II 10m telescope. (Credit: NASA/CXC/Columbia/C. Scharf et al.)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/4c41/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 115
favorite 0
comment 0
This labeled image highlights some of the important features of the Chandra X-ray Observatory image of Centaurus A. At the center of the galaxy is where the active nucleus and the launching point for a jet are featured. Particles in the jet and radiation from the active nucleus are both powered by a supermassive black hole. To the upper left the jet is shown, and the shorter "counterjet" points in the opposite direction. (Credit: NASA/CXC/CfA/R.Kraft et al.)
Topic: What -- Centaurus
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2008/cena/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 124
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical image from Hubble and Magellan shows a close-up (inset) of one of the galaxies, a spiral galaxy approximately the same size as the Milky Way, within the galaxy cluster known as 1E 0657-56. The full-field view shows over a thousand galaxies in this cluster. These immense objects are among the largest structures in the Universe. View Motion Graphic [ http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/1e0657/animations.html#1e0657_zoom ] Scale: Full-field image is 7.5 x 5.4 arcmin (Credit:...
Topic: What -- Magellan
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/1e0657/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Optical: NOAO/Kitt Peak/J.Uson, D.Dale; X-ray: NASA/CXC/IoA/S.Allen et al.
image
eye 112
favorite 0
comment 0
This optical (blue) and x-ray (red-orange) composite image shows Abell 2029, a cluster of galaxies. A large elliptical galaxy is visible in the center of the image, surrounded by smaller galaxies. The red diffuse emission shows hot intergalactic gas, heated to about 100 million degrees by the enormous gravity in the cluster, and visible only in X-rays. This galaxy cluster has a redshift of 0.078, at a distance corresponding to a light travel time of one billion years. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/darkenergy/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 84
favorite 0
comment 0
More Images of G292.0+1.8
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2001/0112/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/Penn State/G.Chartas et al
image
eye 104
favorite 0
comment 0
This is Chandra's X-ray view of the so-called Cloverleaf quasar, a single object whose image has been reproduced four times through an effect known as "gravitational lensing." This process occurs when the gravitational field of a massive, intervening object bends and magnifies light from a distant quasar to produce the multiple images. The foreground galaxies in this case are too faint to be seen in these images. One of the images in the Cloverleaf is brighter than the others in both...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/h1413/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 147
favorite 0
comment 0
This colored Chandra X-ray Observatory image (inset) shows Westerlund 2 in context with the Spitzer infrared observation (black & white). Westerlund 2 is a young star cluster with an estimated age of about one or two million years. Until recently little was known about this cluster because it is heavily obscured by dust and gas. However, using infrared and X-ray observations to overcome this obscuration, Westerlund 2 has become regarded as one of the most interesting star clusters in the...
Topic: Where -- Milky Way Galaxy
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2008/wd2/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 103
favorite 0
comment 0
This is an X-ray image of the galaxy cluster Abell 3627 obtained with the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. The galaxy ESO 137-001 is plunging towards the center of the cluster, as shown by the direction of its tail (see the box which shows the field in the composite image). The X-ray emission is from multimillion degree gas that is pervading the cluster. (Credit: XMM credit: ESA/MSU/M.Sun et al)
Topic: What -- ESO
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/a3627/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 MS 0735: NASA/CXC/Ohio U./B.McNamara et al.; Perseus: NASA/CXC/IoA/A.Fabian et al.
image
eye 97
favorite 0
comment 0
This montage compares the physical size of the cavities found in MS 0735 and the Perseus cluster, another well-known galaxy cluster with cavities. These two clusters are at very different distances -- Perseus is about 250 million light years away and MS 0735 is almost three billion light years away. To make a direct size comparison, the Perseus cluster is shrunk to simulate its appearance at the farther distance of MS 0735. From this comparison, it is obvious that the cavities in MS 0735 are...
Topic: What -- Perseus
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/ms0735/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 110
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration depicts how the catastrophic destruction of a star that wandered too close to a supermassive black hole may have occurred. A close encounter with another star put the doomed star (orange circle) on a path that took it near a supermassive black hole. The enormous gravity of the giant black hole stretched the star until it was torn apart. Because of the momentum and energy of the accretion process, only a few percent of the disrupted star's mass (indicated by the white stream)...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/rxj1242/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 121
favorite 0
comment 0
Astrophysicist Maxim Markevitch on Dark Matter
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/1e0657/qa.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 121
favorite 0
comment 0
This is an artist's representation of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) at the center of a galaxy. Gas is pulled towards a supermassive black hole and falls onto a disk, shown in red. Some of this gas spirals inwards, generating massive amounts of radiation before falling onto the black hole. This infall of matter is only possible if the gas loses some of its energy either through a wind, shown in blue, or friction in the disk. The most spectacular AGN behavior is seen in quasars, the brightest...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/j1655/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 154
favorite 0
comment 0
This image taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope provides a detailed look at Cassiopeia A in optical light. The Hubble image shows the complex and intricate structure of the star's shattered fragments. The image is a composite made from 18 separate images taken in December 2004 using Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). More Information at Hubble [ http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2006/30/ ] (Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA))
Topics: What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What -- Cassiopeia, What -- Advanced Camera for Surveys
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/casa/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 105
favorite 0
comment 0
This image shows the same region of the galactic center in mid-infrared as the new Chandra mosiac. (Credit: MSX)
Topic: What -- MSX
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2002/gcenter/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/NRAO/F.Yusef-Zadeh
image
eye 109
favorite 0
comment 0
This image of the galactic center was taken on March 31, 1984 with NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA). Displayed in red, the image shows some of the filamentary structures that appear in centimeter radio wavelengths. The field of view is the same as the Chandra image. Scale:
Topics: What -- Very Large Array, What -- VLA
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/sgra/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/SAO/G. Fabbiano
image
eye 62
favorite 0
comment 0
This is a spectrum of a region in The Antennae galaxies that shows the physical signatures of elements of iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), and silicon (Si). Spectroscopy is the study of how different atoms absorb and emit light and can reveal the chemical composition of astronomical objects.
Topic: Where -- Antennae Galaxies
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/antennae/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/UMass/Q.D.Wang et al.
image
eye 102
favorite 0
comment 0
This image shows only the low-energy X-rays (0.5-2.0 keV) as observed by Chandra. The green squares mark the locations of galaxies that belong to the cluster known as Abell 2125. The galaxies that are known to be bright in both radio and X-ray emission are also noted in blue and with crosses. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/a2125/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of AZ/C. Engelbracht
image
eye 101
favorite 0
comment 0
This infrared image from the Spitzer Space telescope [ http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/releases/ssc2006-09/ssc2006-09a.shtml ] shows Messier 82, an irregular-shaped galaxy positioned on its side, as a diffuse bar of blue light. Fanning out from its top and bottom like the wings of a butterfly are huge red clouds of dust believed to contain a compound similar to car exhaust. The smelly material, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, can be found on Earth in tailpipes, barbecue pits and...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Earth, Where -- M82
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/m82/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/Penn State/E.Feigelson & K.Getman et al.
image
eye 131
favorite 0
comment 0
This is a deep image of the Orion Nebula Nebula Cluster made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, containing over 1,600 X-ray sources. About 1,400 of these sources are young stars in the Orion Nebula Nebula and the rest are either background galaxies or foreground stars. The red X-ray sources are mostly young stars in Orion Nebula with little absorption by intervening gas and the blue X-ray sources are mostly young stars with larger amounts of gas absorption. The luminous source in the middle of...
Topic: What -- Orion
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/orion/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 X-ray image: NASA/CXC/Ohio U./B.McNamara et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss
image
eye 98
favorite 0
comment 0
This image shows the Chandra X-ray image of the galaxy cluster MS 0735.6+7421 (left) in context with a labeled illustration of the system (right). The two giant cavities (dark red regions) found in the X-ray emitting, hot gas (bright red) in the galaxy cluster are evidence for the massive eruption. A supermassive black hole at the center of the bright X-ray emission caused the eruption. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/ms0735/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 123
favorite 0
comment 0
This image was taken by ROSAT in June of 1990 when the Moon was about half-full. Chandra's observations of the Moon solved a decade-long mystery about X-rays detected by ROSAT that were thought to be coming from the dark portion of the Moon. It turns out that these X-rays only appear to come from the Moon and can be explained by radiation from Earth's geocorona. (Credit: ROSAT/J. Schmitt et al.)
Topics: What -- ROSAT, What -- Moon
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/moon/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 84
favorite 0
comment 0
This image, taken with Spitzer's infrared vision, shows a fraction of these black holes, which are located deep in the bellies of distant, massive galaxies. Spitzer originally scanned the field of galaxies shown in the picture as part of a multiwavelength program called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, or Goods. This picture shows a portion of the Goods field called Goods-South. When astronomers saw the Spitzer data, they were surprised to find that hundreds of the galaxies between...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/goods/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 IPAC/JPL/Caltech
image
eye 77
favorite 0
comment 0
This image shows the elliptical galaxy NGC 4261 in infrared light as observed by the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). The field of view is the same as the Chandra image. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/ngc4261/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 76
favorite 0
comment 0
This images compares the composite image of 3C321 to an artist's illustration of the system, showing the main galaxy and the companion galaxy. A jet of particles generated by a supermassive black hole at the center of the main galaxy is striking the companion galaxy. The jet is disrupted and deflected by this impact. The key features of this system are labeled in the final view. (Credit: Image: X-ray: NASA/CXC/CfA/D.Evans et al.; Optical/UV: NASA/STScI; Radio: NSF/VLA/CfA/D.Evans et al.,...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/3c321/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/SAO/G. Fabbiano et al.
image
eye 90
favorite 0
comment 0
This image is a composite of three maps tracing the abundances of elements found in The Antennae system. These elements are coded so that iron appears as red, magnesium as green, and silicon as blue. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/antennae/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 3C58: NASA/CXC/SAO/P.Slane et al.; Crab Nebula: NASA/CXC/ASU/J.Hester et al.
image
eye 84
favorite 0
comment 0
This image shows the strong similarities between the center of 3C58 and the Crab Nebula pulsar -- one of the most famous objects in astronomy. The 3C58 pulsar, the Crab Nebula pulsar, and a growing list of other pulsars offer dramatic proof that strong electromagnetic fields around rapidly rotating neutron stars are powerful generators of both high-energy particles and magnetic fields. This side-by-side view of 3C58 and Crab compares the physical size of the two objects. The image of the Crab...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/3c58/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 273
favorite 0
comment 0
This image of the spiral galaxy Messier 51 (M51) was taken by GALEX on June 19th and 20th 2003. This picture is a combination of GALEX images taken with the FUV (colored blue) and NUV detectors (colored red). M51 has a close companion galaxy to the North that is only just visible in the NUV detector and so looks faint and red in this image. This indicates that there is very little star formation occurring in the companion galaxy. The red stars in this image are foreground stars in our own Milky...
Topics: What -- GALEX, Where -- M51, Where -- Milky Way Galaxy, Where -- Whirlpool Galaxy
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/m51/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 96
favorite 0
comment 0
This image from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) shows the spiral galaxy NGC 5746 in visible light. The field of view is the same as the Chandra image above. (Credit: Palomar DSS)
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/n5746/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NAOJ/Subaru/H.Ebeling
image
eye 86
favorite 0
comment 0
This image of the galaxy cluster MACSJ1423 is a 3-color optical image from the Subaru prime focus camera. It shows white and blue galaxies centered around a large elliptical galaxy. The mass of the hot gas is about 6 times greater than the mass of all the billions of stars in all of the galaxies in the cluster. This galaxy cluster has a redshift of 0.54, at a distance corresponding to a light travel time of 5.4 billion years. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/darkenergy/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 65
favorite 0
comment 0
This image from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) shows 3C442A in visible light. The field of view is the same as the Chandra image. (Credit: Pal.Obs. DSS)
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/3c442a/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 ESO/VLT/P.Rosati et al.
image
eye 65
favorite 0
comment 0
This image combines optical and near-infrared (red, yellow, and green) emission from galaxies in the cluster RDCS 1252.9-2927 as taken by the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Cerro Paranal. Observations using the VLT provided a precise measurement of the distance to the cluster. Scale:
Topics: What -- Very Large Telescope, What -- VLT
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/rdcs1252/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Pal.Obs. DSS
image
eye 117
favorite 0
comment 0
This image from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) shows the spiral galaxy M101 (NGC 5457), a.k.a. the Pinwheel Galaxy, in visible light. The field of view marked in the version on the left is the same as the Chandra image. Scale:
Topics: What -- Visible Light, Where -- M101, Where -- NGC 5457, Where -- Pinwheel Galaxy
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/m101/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 124
favorite 0
comment 0
This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows Cassiopeia A in infrared light. The faint, blue glow surrounding the dead star is material that was energized by a shock wave, called the forward shock, which was created when the star blew up. The forward shock is now located at the outer edge of the blue glow. Stars are also seen in blue. Green, yellow and red primarily represent material that was ejected in the explosion and heated by a slower shock wave, called the reverse shock wave. The...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Cassiopeia, What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/casa/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 42
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration shows the absorption of X-rays from the quasar Mkn 421 by two intergalactic clouds of diffuse hot gas. These distant clouds (located 150 million and 370 million light years from Earth), are likely part of a predicted diffuse web-like system of hot gas clouds - the cosmic web - from which galaxies and clusters of galaxies are thought to have formed. This discovery is strong evidence that atoms and ions known to be present shortly after the Big Bang, but missing in inventories...
Topics: What -- Earth, What -- Discovery
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/mkn421/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/P.Slane et al.;
image
eye 37
favorite 0
comment 0
This image from the 1.3m McGraw-Hill shows 3C58 in visible light compared with Chandra's X-ray data of the same field of view. The optical image was taken on January 13, 2004. Scale:
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/3c58/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Pal.Obs. DSS
image
eye 56
favorite 0
comment 0
This image from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) shows the elliptical galaxy M87 in visible light. The field of view is the same as the Chandra image. Scale:
Topics: What -- Visible Light, Where -- M87
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/m87/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Titan's Path: NASA/CXC/Penn State/K.Mori et al.; Crab Nebula: NASA/CXC/ASU/J.Hester et al.
image
eye 40
favorite 0
comment 0
This graphic shows how closely to the Crab Nebula's center Titan passed during the transit of January 5, 2003. Although Titan passes within a few degrees of the Crab every 30 years, it rarely passes directly in front of it. This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the nebula was formed by a supernova that was observed to occur in the year 1054. The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a millennium event. More...
Topic: What -- Titan
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/titan/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 33
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration depicts a massive black hole like the one at the center of the Cloverleaf quasar. Around it is a swirling disk of gas, which gradually pours down into the black hole. As the gas falls inward, it heats up and glows brightly, getting hotter and hotter the closer it is to the event horizon. Some of the gas is blown away from the disk like steam from a kettle. As this gas streams off the disk, the intense radiation generated by the very hot gas near the event horizon forces the...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/h1413/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 90
favorite 0
comment 0
This Hubble Space Telescope image of Saturn, captured in November 2000 (1 of 5 images taken from 1996-2000), show Saturn's rings nearly fully open as it moved towards winter in its Northern Hemisphere. Saturn's equator is tilted relative to its orbit by 27 degrees, very similar to the 23-degree tilt of the Earth. As Saturn moves along its orbit, first one hemisphere, then the other is tilted towards the Sun. This cyclical change causes seasons on Saturn, just as the changing orientation of...
Topics: What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What -- Saturn, What -- Earth, What -- Sun
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/saturn_rngs/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 38
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration shows two spiral galaxies - each with supermassive black holes at their center - as they are about to collide. The latest Chandra results suggest that such collisions may cause extreme black hole and galaxy growth in the early Universe, setting the stage for the birth of quasars. (Credit: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/smg/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 183
favorite 0
comment 0
This image combines data from four different observatories: the Chandra X-ray Observatory (purple); the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite (ultraviolet/blue); the Hubble Space Telescope (visible/green); the Spitzer Space Telescope (infrared/red). The unique shape of the Cartwheel Galaxy with its huge rim - larger than the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy - is likely due to a collision with one of the smaller galaxies on the lower left several hundred million years ago. The insets to the right...
Topics: What -- Galaxy Evolution Explorer, What -- Explorer, What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What --...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/cartwheel/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 36
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration explains the process that astronomers think triggered the explosion in SN 2006gy. When a star is very massive, its core can produce so much gamma-ray light that some of the energy from the radiation is converted into particle and anti-particle pairs. The resulting drop in energy causes the star to collapse under its own huge gravity. After this violent collapse, runaway thermonuclear reactions (not shown here) ensue and the star explodes, spewing the remains into space....
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/sn2006gy/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 40
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration shows three possible futures for the Universe, depending on the behavior of dark energy, by showing how the scale of the Universe may change with time. If dark energy is constant, as the new Chandra results suggest, the expansion should continue accelerating forever. If dark energy increases, the acceleration may happen so quickly that galaxies, stars, and eventually atoms will be torn apart, in the so-called Big Rip. Dark energy may also lead to a recollapse of the Universe,...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/darkenergy/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 X-ray: NASA/CXC/AIfA/D.Hudson & T.Reiprich et al.
image
eye 34
favorite 0
comment 0
This composite X-ray/radio image of Abell 400 shows radio jets (pink), immersed in a vast cloud of multimillion degree X-ray emitting gas (blue) that pervades the cluster. The jets emanate from the vicinity of two supermassive black holes (bright spots in the image) in the galaxy. The raw Chandra data of the two sources (shown left in the pullout & also on the right) has been labeled A400-42 and A400-43. Scale:
Topic: What -- VLA
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/a400/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 24
favorite 0
comment 0
This graphic shows the XMM-Newton spectrum, or X-ray energy signature, of RX J1242-11 alongside an artist's illustration of the event that was observed in this galaxy. The illustration shows a disk of gas being heated so that it glows in X-rays before being swallowed by the black hole. The gas in the disk is the debris from a star torn apart by tidal forces about 10 years earlier. (Spectrum: ESA/XMM-Newton/S. Komossa et al. Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/rxj1242/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 43
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration and its companion are intended to demonstrate the implications of various sizes of dark matter particles. The analogy compares dark matter particles to the people gathered in Times Square. In this image, the people are relatively small and, therefore, can congregate relatively close to one another. In the situation of dark matter, this would mean that astronomers would expect that dark matter would be confined to relatively small areas if the particles were smallish. (Credit:...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2001/0164/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/MIT/UMass Amherst/M.D.Stage et al.
image
eye 49
favorite 0
comment 0
This figure shows regions in Cas A where the X-ray emission is generated by electrons spiraling along magnetic field lines and being accelerated as they pass across the remnant's shock front. In this acceleration map, the brighter parts of the image show where the acceleration is occurring relatively quickly. In the brightest areas the electrons are being accelerated almost as fast as theoretically possible. Scale:
Topics: What -- FAST, What -- Cassiopeia
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/casa/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/ESA/J.Blakeslee (JHU)/M.Postman (STScI)/P.Rosati (ESO)
image
eye 72
favorite 0
comment 0
This Hubble image reveals the core of the cluster RDCS 1252.9-2927. Dominating the core are a pair of large, reddish elliptical galaxies [near center of image]. Their red color indicates an older population of stars. Most of the stars are at least 1 billion years old. The two galaxies appear to be interacting, and may eventually merge to form a larger galaxy that is comparable to the brightest galaxies seen in present-day clusters. The image was assembled from observations taken between May and...
Topic: What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/rdcs1252/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 28
favorite 0
comment 0
This graph shows the intrinsic brightness of SN 2006gy and how it changes over time. The graphic also demonstrates how much brighter SN 2006gy is when compared to typical examples of the two main supernova classes. Type Ia supernovas involve the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf and type II supernovas are the collapse of a massive star. The famous supernova SN 1987A is also shown. Not only does SN 2006gy get much brighter than other supernovas but it stays very bright for much longer....
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/sn2006gy/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 32
favorite 0
comment 0
This figure shows the typical growth of supermassive black holes with masses less than about 100 million Suns. These black holes grow much more slowly than the biggest black holes. Typically they will not reach their weight limit for another several billion years. This slow growth is similar to the growth of the black holes' host galaxies. (Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/bhlock/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 22
favorite 0
comment 0
This Digitized Sky Survey optical image helps show the dramatic difference between what is seen in various wavelengths. (Credit: Pal.Obs. DSS)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/g292/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 28
favorite 0
comment 0
This graphic shows a wide-field view of the Puppis A supernova remnant along with a close-up image of the neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, that is moving at a blistering pace. The larger field-of-view is a composite of X-ray data from the ROSAT satellite (pink) and optical data (purple), from the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory 0.9-meter telescope, which highlights oxygen emission. Astronomers think Puppis A was created when a massive star ended its life in a supernova explosion...
Topics: What -- Puppis, What -- ROSAT
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/puppis/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss
image
eye 48
favorite 0
comment 0
This illustration depicts the motions of a gas cloud in the core of the Fornax cluster and a group of galaxies on the outskirts of the cluster. A collision between the cluster core and the group will occur in a few billion years. The Fornax core and the galaxy group may lie along part of a large filamentary structure of dark matter (shown as a faint gray structure) that is collapsing and flowing in toward a common center. The swept back appearance of the gas in the core of the cluster is due to...
Topic: What -- Fornax
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/fornax/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 44
favorite 0
comment 0
This comparison between the Chandra (left) and Hubble (right) images of the Crab Nebula shows 3 sets of full field views. (Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/ASU/J. Hester et al.; Optical: NASA/HST/ASU/J. Hester et al.)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2002/0052/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 22
favorite 0
comment 0
This color composite combines Spitzer [ http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/ ] infrared, Chandra X-ray and ground-based H-alpha data in a wide-field view (left panel). The color assignments are: Chandra (all bands) (blue), CTIO ground-based H-alpha (green), Spitzer 4.5 micron (yellow) and Spitzer 8.0 micron (red). On the upper right, X-rays from Chandra reveal new details in N63a. The lower right panel shows a close-up from Hubble of the violent mass of gas and dust in the central region of the...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2003/n63a/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 Optical: NAOJ/Subaru/H. Ebeling; X-Ray: NASA/CXC/IoA/S.Allen et al.
image
eye 32
favorite 0
comment 0
This composite image shows views of the galaxy cluster MACSJ1423, using optical and X-ray telescopes. The optical image, a 3-color composite from the Subaru prime focus camera, shows white and blue galaxies centered around a large elliptical galaxy. The Chandra X-ray image shows hot gas displayed in red. The mass of the hot gas is about 6 times greater than the mass of all the billions of stars in all of the galaxies in the cluster. This galaxy cluster have a redshift of 0.54, at a distance...
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/darkenergy/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 23
favorite 0
comment 0
This Chandra X-ray image shows the full-field view of the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae. Located within this image is 47 Tuc W, a double, or binary star system consisting of a normal star and a pulsar. The pulsar rotates every 2.35 milliseconds. Chandra's image of 47 Tucanae shows about 20 millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster, but 47 Tuc W stands out from the crowd because it produces more high-energy X-rays than the others. (Credit: NASA/CXC/Northwestern U./C.Heinke et al.)
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/47tuc/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
image
eye 36
favorite 0
comment 0
This composite X-ray (red)/optical (black & white) image provides an alternative false-color scheme of the the dying, Sun-like star NGC 40. This planetary nebula is located about 3,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Cepheus. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/RIT/J.Kastner & R.Montez.; Optical: NSF/AURA/NOAO/WIYN)
Topics: What -- Sun, What -- Earth, What -- Constellation, What -- Cepheus
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2005/n40/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/B.Gaensler et al.; Radio: NRAO/AUI/NSF
image
eye 26
favorite 0
comment 0
This composite image (X-ray in gold and radio in blue) shows a close-up of the head of the Mouse where a shock wave has formed as a young pulsar plows through interstellar space. Clouds of high-energy particles are swept back from the Mouse as it plows through the interstellar gas. A bright X-ray source marks the location of the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. Scale:
Topic: What -- VLA
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/mouse/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/SSC/J. Keohane et al.
image
eye 41
favorite 0
comment 0
This Chandra X-ray image reveals a barrel-shaped supernova remnant around a glowing bar of intense X-radiation. These X-rays are produced by jets of 15 million degree Celsius gas that is rich in iron and nickel. These features indicate that W49B was produced when the core of a rapidly-rotating massive star collapsed to form a black hole, triggering the ejection of high-energy jets of material. Scale:
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/w49b/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/ESA/ASU/J.Hester & A.Loll
image
eye 93
favorite 0
comment 0
This composite image of the Crab Nebula was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope?s Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in October 1999, January 2000, and December 2000. It is one of the largest images taken by Hubble and is the highest resolution image ever made of the entire Crab Nebula. More Information at Hubble [ http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2005/37/ ] Scale:
Topics: What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What -- Camera 2
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/crab/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/UMass/D. Wang et al.
image
eye 33
favorite 0
comment 0
This composite image is a close-up view of the galaxy C153 and its diffuse X-ray trail. In this version, red represents optical emission from Hubble's Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 in the "V-band). Green shows Chandra's X-ray data in the 0.5-2 keV range while blue are X-rays from the 2-8 keV energy range. Scale:
Topics: What -- Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, What -- Camera 2
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/c153/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010 NASA/CXC/W. Forman et al.
image
eye 55
favorite 0
comment 0
This close-up of M87 shows the region surrounding the jet of high-energy particles in more detail. The jet is thought to be pointed at a small angle to the line of sight, out of the plane of the image. This jet may be only the latest in a series of jets that have been produced as magnetized gas spirals in a disk toward the supermassive black hole. More information on the M87 Jet [ http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2001/0134/ ]. Scale:
Topic: Where -- M87
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/m87/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 37
favorite 0
comment 0
This composite image of the radio galaxy 3C321 shows the jet from a black hole at the center of the larger galaxy, to the lower left, striking the edge of a companion galaxy to the upper right, the first time such an interaction has been found. The image includes X-ray data from Chandra (colored purple), optical and ultraviolet (UV) data from Hubble (red and orange), and radio emission from the Very Large Array (VLA) and MERLIN (blue). A bright, blue spot in the VLA and MERLIN radio image shows...
Topics: What -- Galaxy 3C, What -- Very Large Array, What -- VLA
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/3c321/more.html
Chandra Space Telescope Collection
Jan 5, 2010
image
eye 27
favorite 0
comment 0
This composite image shows Chandra's wide-field view of the area around the Vela Pulsar (background) with an enhanced view of the pulsar and its wind nebula in the inset box. (Credit: NASA/SAO/CXC)
Topic: What -- Vela
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2001/velawv/more.html
This Chandra X-ray image shows three massive star clusters, the Arches (upper right), Quintuplet (upper center), and the GC star cluster (bottom center), which is near the enormous black hole known as Sagittarius A*. The massive stars in these clusters can themselves be very bright, point-like X-ray sources, when winds blowing off their surfaces collide with winds from an orbiting companion star. Credit: Scale: Image is .
Topic: What -- Sagittarius
Source: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/gcenter/more.html